My Chariot Awaits…

Then the Lord opened the servant’s eyes, and he (the servant) looked and saw the hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha. II Kings 6:17

Your chariot, m’lady.

I can just see the dashing gentleman in tux and tails, hand gestured toward an open, gilded chariot, ushering me inside, onward to a spacious palace.

Swoon worthy image. Stuff of Hollywood.

Long before that, the prophets Elijah and Elisha encountered a chariot. (II Kings 2:11) The chosen pair were walking along together when suddenly a chariot and horses of fire came and separated them. By divine order, the flaming chariot swung low and took Elijah to heaven. 

You thinking of the song I’m thinking of?

Swing low, sweet chariot.

Coming for to carry me home.*

Sweet Chariot is one of a handful of spirituals sung during the time of the Underground Railroad, a song with words coded to hide deeper meaning.

It was a plea for mercy, for refuge. For escape to eternal freedom.

Fire or no fire, they begged for God to send chariots. Lots and lots of them.

Chariots have come for me, too, but they’re unsolicited and serve a different purpose. 

They’re character-building chariots.

Hardships. Unanswered prayer. Disappointments. Suffering. Trials. (a brief lesson in synonyms here). 

A few chapters later in II Kings (6:8-18), the Israelites found themselves surrounded by an Aramean army who’d come in the evening with a mass of chariots and horses. (vs.15)

“Oh, my lord, what shall we do?” the servant (of Elisha) cried out. (vs 15)

Then the Lord opened the servant’s eyes, and he (the servant) looked and saw the hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha. II Kings 6:17

Chariots of fire.

When circumstances aren’t lining up how and when I want and I’m tempted to fear and believe the lie He’s forsaken me (Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you. Hebrews 13:5; see previous post here: Never), may I be given the ability to see these chariots of fire.

The evidence of His presence, His provision, His protection.

If I choose to climb inside, God’s chariots are opportunities to grow in strength and power, to develop a vision for the infinite and eternal.

The thing the Arameans couldn’t see.

Faith must be tested.

A life of faith is an absolute necessity for a holy and victorious life. Streams in the Desert.

And just when I thought my faith had reached peak performance, on distant landscape another chariot of fire awaits.

Where to this time, Lord?

How do you respond when your ‘chariot of fire’ arrives with an opportunity to grow in faith?

*Lyrics to Sweet Chariot

 

1 Comment

  1. Anne Payne says:

    I love this!!! “God’s chariots are opportunities to grow in strength and power, to develop a vision for the infinite and eternal.”

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