When My Hero is Rejected…

But first he (Jesus) must suffer many things and be rejected by this generation. Luke 17:25 (NIV)

For some, to be rejected is worse than death.

No, no. Don’t reject me. Just kill me.

The hero in my current story faces this issue. In one scene, he awaits the heroine’s answer, thinking to himself as his heart thunders behind his ears, Don’t. Reject. Me.

But the hero in my debut, Tom DeLaney, is basically defenseless against reader rejection. Sad for a guy who’s a hyper-vigilant law enforcement officer who’s never without the ability to defend himself or those he loves.

For all the favorable book reviews I’ve received thus far, one among the negatives stands out. Targeting my hero (no pun intended), this particular reader couldn’t get past Tom’s struggle with bitterness and resentment.

In short, my hero was rejected.

As an author, I knew to expect readers to have varied opinions about how characters behaved. We all read through a mental filter shaped by life experience and have set expectations because of it. But if you’d told me my hero must suffer rejection, I’m not sure I’d have been able to swallow that.

Got me thinking about my own redemption story where I’m the heroine and Christ Jesus is the hero. Unlike a traditional romance, though, my hero dies, giving just cause for reader rejection. But also unlike a romance, my hero comes back to life.

The story doesn’t end there. In fact, there is no ending.

Revelation 19:8-9 says He’s coming for his bride (that’s me and all believers) and picked out my gown of fine linen, bright and clean, for what will be the greatest wedding ever. Lavish banquet to follow.

Could my hero be more perfect? I’m a little swoony, y’all.

Sad thing is, Jesus, my hero, must first be rejected. (Luke 17:25)

From the beginning, Jesus knew he had to be rejected…to death. (Genesis 3:15) But had he not been rejected, there’d be no happily ever after. And romance isn’t romance without it. The hero and heroine must end up together in the end.

That’s why I love and write romance. It turns my heart and, I pray, the heart of my readers to the greatest, most valiant and admirable hero of all time.

Jesus’ willingness to suffer rejection freed those like my hero, Tom, from bitterness and resentment.

Of course, if you’re curious about whether or not he came to enjoy this freedom, I invite you to read and discover. ➡️ Call to Love

How has God used your own rejection stories for good? I’d love to hear from you!

Mary

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✏️ Two of my 2019 inspirational articles that were published in Refresh, Online Bible Study Magazine, are featured in this 40 short Bible studies compilation, The Power to Make a Difference Available on Amazon.

1 Comment

  1. In college, there was a guy I liked, but he rejected me. Praise be to God I met my now-husband just a few months later! I can’t imagine any life better than this one, and I’m so thankful God allowed me to experience that rejection.

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